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Archive for the ‘Wedding Traditions’ Category

Wedding traditions are traditions for a reason: they’ve been around a long time. But where did they originate? Our Wedding Traditions Explained series attempts to find out. We have no real evidence to back up these claims, but they were gathered from various online sources. Take them for what they’re worth, and if you’ve heard differing explanations, please share.

Bridal Showers

This custom has roots in Holland. If the bride’s father did not approve of the future groom, he would not provide the proper dowry. Instead the brides friends would “shower” her with gifts so she could marry the man of her choice. The showers also helped to strengthen ties between the bride and her friends.

 

Bachelor Party

Ancient Spartan soldiers were the first to hold stag parties. The groom would feast with his male friends the night before the wedding, where he would say good-bye to the carefree days of bachelorhood and swear continued allegiance to his comrades. This was the last chance before his new wife took over the finances for the groom to gather money by gambling for his own future use.

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Wedding traditions are traditions for a reason: they’ve been around a long time. But where did they originate? Our Wedding Traditions Explained series attempts to find out. We have no real evidence to back up these claims, but they were gathered from various online sources. Take them for what they’re worth, and if you’ve heard differing explanations, please share.

The Honeymoon

There are several legends linked to the tradition of the honeymoon:

– When marriages were done by capture, the groom would take his unwilling bride to a secret place where her relatives wouldn’t find her. They hid while the moon went through its phases and drank a brew made from honey. Hence, honeymoon.

– The ancient Teuton people performed weddings under a full moon. After the ceremony, the bride and groom drank honey wine for thirty days. That time period became known as the honeymoon.

– The honey part of the word represents the sweetness of new marriage, but the moon part represents a bitter acknowledgment that the sweetness, like a full moon, would fade fast.

– The bride was supposed to drink mead brewed from honey for one month after the wedding to encourage fertility.

No, of course, the honeymoon is usually a trip the couple takes together after the wedding.

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Wedding traditions are traditions for a reason: they’ve been around a long time. But where did they originate? Our Wedding Traditions Explained series attempts to find out. We have no real evidence to back up these claims, but they were gathered from various online sources. Take them for what they’re worth, and if you’ve heard differing explanations, please share.

Carrying The Bride Across The Threshold

Here come the evil spirits again. Newlyweds were thought to be very susceptible to evil spirits, so the groom would carry the bride across the threshold, thereby creating a protective layer between the floor and the bride, safeguarding her from the ground monster.

Another possible origin is the old belief that brides should be lady-like and appear to be hesitant to give herself to her husband. The groom would then  have to carry her into the bridal chamber.

Or perhaps she was carried over because it was bad luck to trip or fall when entering her new home. Or maybe it goes back to the days of marriage by capture. A captured bride would be expected to put up a fight upon entering her new home, so she was dragged or carried in.

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Wedding traditions are traditions for a reason: they’ve been around a long time. But where did they originate? Our Wedding Traditions Explained series attempts to find out. We have no real evidence to back up these claims, but they were gathered from various online sources. Take them for what they’re worth, and if you’ve heard differing explanations, please share.

First Kiss
Dating back from early Roman times, the kiss represented a legal bond that sealed all contracts. There was even a time when an engagement would be null and void without one.

The kiss is more than a sign of affection. It has long been a token of bonding – the exchange of spirits as each partner sends a part of the self into the new spouse’s soul.

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Wedding traditions are traditions for a reason: they’ve been around a long time. But where did they originate? Our Wedding Traditions Explained series attempts to find out. We have no real evidence to back up these claims, but they were gathered from various online sources. Take them for what they’re worth, and if you’ve heard differing explanations, please share.

The White Dress

In biblical times, brides wore blue dresses as blue represented purity. Later, women usually just wore their best dress, not often white. In China and Japan, brides have traditionally always worn white,  the color of  mourning. The bride is leaving her family of birth to join that of her husband’s, thereby undergoing a symbolic death.

The first known white wedding dress was worn in 1499 by Anne of Brittany, for her marriage to Louis XII of France. By the late eighteenth century, white had become the standard wedding color. It is thought to symbolize purity and virginity.

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Wedding traditions are traditions for a reason: they’ve been around a long time. But where did they originate? Our Wedding Traditions Explained series attempts to find out. We have no real evidence to back up these claims, but they were gathered from various online sources. Take them for what they’re worth, and if you’ve heard differing explanations, please share.

The Meaning of a “Wedding”

“Wedding” literally meant the purchase of a bride for breeding purposes. The word wedding comes from a root word that means to gamble or wager. The Anglo-Saxon word “wedd” meant that the groom would vow to marry the woman, but it also meant the money or barter that the groom paid the bride’s father. The term “bridal” came from the word “brew.” The bride and groom would drink something called the “bryd ealu” or “bride’s ale,” which evolved into “bridal.”

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Wedding traditions are traditions for a reason: they’ve been around a long time. But where did they originate? Our Wedding Traditions Explained series attempts to find out. We have no real evidence to back up these claims, but they were gathered from various online sources. Take them for what they’re worth, and if you’ve heard differing explanations, please share.

Something Old, Something New, Something Borrowed, Something Blue, and a Sixpence in Your Shoe

Although the last line is usually left off today, this one is pretty straight forward. It dates back to Victorian times and many brides try to arrange their wedding attire accordingly.

“Something old” represents the bride’s link to her family and the past. The bride may choose to wear a piece of family jewelry or her mother or grandmother’s wedding gown.

“Something new” represents hope for good fortune and success in the future. The bride often chooses the wedding gown to represent the new item.

“Something borrowed” usually comes from a happily married woman and is thought to lend some of her good fortune and joy to the new bride.

“Something blue” is a symbol of love, fidelity and purity of the bride.

“A sixpence in her shoe” is to wish the bride wealth in her future life.

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